It"s a bitters!
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It"s a bitters! Bitters price guide by Arthur L. Umberger

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Published by Corker Book Co. in Tyler, Tex .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Bitters bottles -- Prices.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 103.

Statementby Art and Jewel Umberger.
ContributionsUmberger, Jewel, joint author.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsNK5440.B6 U38
The Physical Object
Paginationv.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5751404M
LC Control Number71009335

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  Author and bitters enthusiast Brad Thomas Parsons traces the history of the world’s most storied elixir, from its earliest “snake oil” days to its near evaporation after Prohibition to its ascension as a beloved (and at times obsessed-over) ingredient on the contemporary bar : Potter/Ten Speed/Harmony/Rodale. Jovial and Guido's book is by far the best book on the joys of bitters for digestive and immune health and so much more. It is the most practical, beautiful, and thorough book ever written on bitters/5(48). “Brad Thomas Parsons tracks the bitters boom in his new book Bitters, and manages to elevate herbs to an art form.” —Newsweek, 11/14/11 “Fascinating Parsons offer[s] techniques for making bitters at home as well as a great collection of unique cocktail recipes.” —The Washington Post, 11/8/   Dr. Adam Elmegirab’s Book of Bitters: The bitter and twisted history of one of the cocktail world’s most fascinating ingredients Hardcover – Octo by Adam Elmegirab (Author)/5(3).

Urban Moonshine offers Digestive Bitters, Healthy Liver Bitters, and Calm Tummy Bitters. ($/2 oz) ($/2 oz) Flora Health makes alcohol-free Swedish : Tiffany La Forge.   The orange bitters always mentioned first. Famed bartender Gary Regan developed this zesty bitters in the s, based on a recipe from the book Author: Janet Rausa Fuller. Author and bitters enthusiast Brad Thomas Parsons traces the history of the world’s most storied elixir, from its earliest “snake oil” days to its near evaporation after Prohibition to its ascension as a beloved (and at times obsessed-over) ingredient on the contemporary bar scene. Peychaud’s: “Peychaud’s has hints of anise and citrus.” If Angostura is the salt, “This is the pepper.” – Teague Regan’s Orange Bitters: Along with Angostura and Peychaud’s, “These are the bitters that will be called for the vast majority of cocktail recipes. Therefore you will find them the most useful, when trying to recreate your favorite bartenders drink at home.”.

Part recipe book, part project guide, part barman’s manifesto, Bitters is a celebration of good cocktails made well, and of the once-forgotten but blessedly rediscovered virtues of bitters. Praise “Finally, here is an entire book devoted to the history, culture, and uses of the herbal elixir.”.   Bitters occupy a curious niche in the history of food and drinks, especially given their early history as patent medicines with rather dubious one of the oldest, Angostura.   By the time this book was released, bartenders and mixologists were already hearing about DIY bitters – but few had actually implemented them in their bars. In my opinion, this book marked a turning point, when homemade bitters went from the home bars of bloggers and became much more common in craft cocktail bars. Orange bitters are commonly called for in older cocktail recipes. An early recipe for such bitters can be found in The English and Australian Cookery Book: "Make your own bitters as follows, and we can vouch for their superiority. One ounce and a half of gentian-root, one ounce and a half of lemon-peel, one ounce and a half of orange-peel.